The importance of good shoes

You’d think I’d know better, being a stage combat instructor and all…. When you’re doing a show, wear good shoes. Or, at least, ones that don’t completely suck. Our show doesn’t have any real combat in it, or any real tricky footwork at all. However, while running across stage to do a quick change, jumping seemed like a good idea (cover more ground and all). My 20.00 (USD) shoes from Payless Shoe Source (you know, the ones with negative ankle support) didn’t think so much of the jumping and especially the landing part.

So, 10 minutes into the show I roll my ankle over.  Yippee! I actually sprained a part of my foot I’ve never sprained before: the bit directly opposite of the arch, right on the outside of the foot. Feels great. Luckily, I only have 3 shows tomorrow!

Lesson? Buy decent shoes (especially if you can write them off–blipey, you moron). Learned? Oh yeah.

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2 Comments

Filed under Shoes, Theater/Stage Plays

2 responses to “The importance of good shoes

  1. Wyoming

    Sounds like a strain to the fifth metatarsal, a common sprain in the foot when people are jumping or leaping. The metatarsal is poorly attached to the rest of the foot and it is easy to sprain. In fact there is a name given to this type of sprain since it is so common. I just can’t remember the name. Still it can be painful for several weeks. Something that can help is a light elastic wrap or tape around the lower foot and up through the arch to support the outer metatarsal and keep the arch from flattening quite so much. Good luck. By the way I get most of my shoes from Famous Footwear, an UPSCALE shoe outlet. I;ve had great luck for several years finding short, wide widths.

  2. Hmmm. Might try that ritzy Famous Footwear; it sounds nice. I suppose I can go and get a wrap at Walgreen’s or something. I should look into it, because I popped my foot no fewer than 3 times today. An interesting feeling…much like hitting your funny bone. Not condusive to doing a show.

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